Choose Your Poison

canna_risk5At the risk of seeming contrary since I added a new header for the blog that contains a rally cry for those who first stood up against taxes meant for the poor man in early American history (“Huzzah for the Whiskey Boys”), I wanted to show readers that my claims of Cannabis demonizing by the government/media/corporations has been shown to be propaganda and outright lies.

If interested, you should read about the Whiskey Rebellion and how us “White Indians” took on the Watermelon Army.

Many of us have been hoodwinked into believing all the lies about cannabis. It took $Billions and a constant many decades long pushRgvS7 from those who profit from the prohibition to make you so uneducated about the subject.

But, as is my nature, I find that any time officials tell me some storyline, I already know it to be bullshit 99% of the time. I also have the benefit of several decades of personal knowledge of the subject and know hundreds of people that understand the same thing… that cannabis is not in any way, dangerous to one’s health and welfare. The biggest issue with cannabis is the police state that has been formed around that lie. The most dangerous thing that could ever happen to a cannabis user is being arrested and one’s life ruined. It has absolutely nothing to do with the “danger” of the drug, no matter what this moron, OK Rep Markwayne Mullin says about it:

At a town hall meeting last night, Oklahoma Second District Congressman Markwayne Mullin slammed President Barack Obama for suggesting that recreational marijuana use is no more dangerous than social drinking, the Tulsa World‘s Randy Krehbiel reports.

Rep. Mullin was responding to a question about Obama’s position on marijuana, and he did so in a way that very closely resembled the argument favored by Fox News’ Sean Hannity — “I can drink a beer or two and I don’t really feel anything,” Hannity is fond saying, but “you can’t smoke a joint and not feel something.”

When asked about the president’s position, Rep. Mullin replied that “you can be a social drinker and not get drunk,” but “there’s no way you can take a drag on a joint without feeling it.”

“You can not — and I can’t speak to this, because I’m one of these guys who’s never tasted a drug in his life — but there is no way you can take a drag off a joint and not feel a little different. It alters your way of thinking.”

Rep. Mullin continued by saying that “those who smoke marijuana do so to get high, that’s the only purpose. There’s no other reason.”

“What about pain?” asked one town hall attendee.

“Pain?” a visibly annoyed Mullin replied. “Pain? I have screws and plates in me from [my head] to my toes, so I know about pain. The pain doesn’t go away, you just mask it (with drugs). The pain is still there. You have to learn to deal with it. Then you can move on with your life.”

“The only thing that [pain] does is give you an excuse [as to] why you can’t do something, of why you can’t accomplish something — ‘because I hurt.’”

God_made_weed,_man_made_beerI have had countless people explain to me how bad weed is. That it is worse than alcohol and as bad as heroin, crack, etc. Many, if not most of those people have NEVER even tried it, much less used it for any medical reasons. Perhaps there are a few people that have problems with it (I have one dear friend that says it makes him so paranoid that he won’t use it… but he drinks a 12 pack or more daily). I contend that most paranoia is based upon what one thinks might happen if they get caught by the police (or employer), not that the stuff makes them paranoid in and of itself (although there may be some that experience this). It would be such a small minority of users to make it insignificant. Differing strains have different effects on people, so if paranoia is an issue, find a strain that doesn’t induce it. (Of course, this would be easier if one could go to the liquorweed store and buy the exact strain they want like picking out your preferred Vodka)

My push has become a medical pursuit, but I also know that this is a freedom related issue. One should be free to use something that is so much less hazardous/damaging than alcohol (which, as I mentioned, is used by some of the very same ones who argue against marijuana in the first place), even IF there sole reason is to “get high”. Will Mark or Hannity tell me that people do not use alcohol to “get high”? Seriously? It was the only reason I ever used it. There certainly is hardly any medical benefit from it, yet I can (and have) posted hundreds of articles and links that prove marijuana efficacy.

Someone like MarkyMark Dumbass of OK, who has NEVER “tasted a drug in his life”, is going to explain to someone who has “tasted drugs” for a majority of his life, that it is not beneficial or IS worse than alcohol (btw: I don’t drink any more because the stuff makes me sick, kills people, and I have seen it ruin lives… none of which holds true with cannabis) has no factual basis except propaganda to go by. (I’m sure that the substantial donation from the National Beer Wholesalers Assn has nothing to do with his anti-pot platform)

I’m sorry, but anyone who has never tried it and wants to explain to those who have how awful it is should stfu because they do not know what they are talking about.

Period.

tumblr_n03t4mIA8J1spdt2jo1_500

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White Slaves

 Where are my reparations?

WHITE-SLAVES-134423207196_xlargeDon’t I deserve part of that $777TRILLION, since my ancestors were the first slaves brought here?

Black people have been given an invalid trump card to use any time they have the need to obscure facts or to garner sympathy (and perhaps some sort of reparations). They use this card to also justify their animalistic attacks against their imagined oppressors, the white race.

Yes, there were thousands of blacks sold and used in slavery. But what gives them the sole claim to this tragedy when there were as many, if not more, white slaves, too? Not only that, but the first slaves brought to America were white.

The enslavement of Whites extended throughout the American colonies and White slave labor was a crucial factor in the economic development of the colonies. Gradually it developed into a fixed system every bit as rigid and codified as negro slavery was to become. In fact, negro slavery was efficiently established in colonial America because Black slaves were governed, organized and controlled by the structures and organization that were first used to enslave and control Whites. Black slaves were “late corners fitted into a system already developed.” (Ulrich B. Phillips, Life and Labor in the Old South, pp. 25-26).

 

Jewish-control-of-Slave-Trade

The black slave trade was run by Jews who were white imposters. The Jew uses this trick to hide within our group, while continuing their criminality as a tribe. How many times white_slavery-21have other races accused white folks for doing what a Jewish infiltrator is guilty of? And yes, they find their suitable white goyim to be their face and to distance themselves from their participation, allowing blame to be thrust onto the white race, as a whole.

The fact of the matter is that Jewish families, by huge amounts, owned more slaves than the average white family. Its just that they hide within our group to keep their guilt hidden and are allowed to blame us for everything. As a matter of fact, very few white families owned slaves, no matter how hard the narrative tries to implicate all of our families.

Truth is that white people were the ones that STOPPED slavery, except in Africa and other places where those people STILL enslave people (but you don’t see it here, do you?). No, they want to continue the lie while their own are still enslaving theirs to this day.

And not that you will ever hear about Israel’s continued slave trade for their wall humpers, but what does not happen here in America, is still going on in Israel.

h/t DiggerForTruth

This is an excellent interview of Michael Hoffman regarding his book, The Untold History of the Enslavement of Whites in Early America:

Read excerpts from Rabbi Marc Lee Raphael’s book, Jews and Judaism in the United States: A Documentary History

Also, See The Jewish Onslaught

(On a side mote, I want to give a black man, Walter Williams, as a “gracious and generous grantor“, a small measure of appreciation for his granting me and other European descendants, a Proclamation of Amnesty and Pardon. Too bad he doesn’t understand that black people weren’t the only slaves and were actually a minority in the early American slave trade. But, at least he goes to some length to set part of the issue correctly.)

WWilliamAmnesty

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Political Promises

We're sweeping out the Bullshit

We’re sweeping out the Bullshit


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All posts are opinions meant to foster comment, reporting, teaching & study under the “fair use doctrine” in Sec. 107 of U.S. Code Title 17. No statement of fact is made or should be implied. Ads appearing on this blog are solely the product of the advertiser and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of BuehlahMan’s Revolt or WordPress.com

How to Become a “Made Man” in the Media

How to Become a “Made Man” in the Media

by DC Dave

David Corn

David Corn

A late uncle of mine who flew a spotter plane for the Air Force during the height of the Vietnam War once told me that during his stint there one of our “intelligence services” tried to recruit him. He declined the offer, he told me, but only after he had gone so far as to take a required “psychological evaluation” for them. The experience, he told me, appalled him. “I could tell from the questions,” he said, “that they were looking for someone who was immoral.”

Many years later I told that story to a small group at a party in the Washington, DC, area. Among the group was a young man whose friends strongly suspect of being in the CIA. Unable to restrain himself he blurted out, “I took that test.”

I have less direct evidence for it, but I have been told that at least in the covert action field, it is common for novices to be required to perform some illegal act so that they will be compromised against turning into whistleblowers later in their covert careers.

I found myself reflecting on this sordid vetting process for members of our clandestine services as I was surfing the cable news channels the other day to

Peter Baker

Peter Baker

see how they might be spinning the latest ceasefire in Ukraine, the one brokered by Germany and France, without U.S. participation. Who should I see there—on MSNBC, I believe it was—offering their “expert” opinions back-to-back but two journalists whose paths had crossed mine when I was following the case of the mysterious death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent W. Foster, Jr. in the 1990s. They were David Corn and Peter Baker.

I first became aware of Corn when we both attended a press conference in Washington, DC, in the spring of 1995 in which Christopher Ruddy announced the findings of three investigators that tended to support Ruddy’s theory that Foster had not died at the place where the body had been found. Ruddy’s loudest and most aggressive antagonist at that news conference was Corn, then working for The Nation magazine. I have since come to realize that the scene I witnessed there was nothing more than a show, with Ruddy playing the rightist and Corn the leftist. The “investigation” that Ruddy was touting, I have since figured out, was little more than a charade, as I explain briefly in the recent article, “Latest Foster Cover-Up Book Not Completely Worthless.” Corn’s objections, as I recall, did not address the real weaknesses in what Ruddy was reporting, but simply amounted to the usual “conspiracy theory” denunciation.

Corn has continued to play his role of leftist Clinton-couple defender, as we see in his Mother Jones article of a year ago, “Here Come the Crazy Clinton Conspiracies of the 1990s.” Ruddy, on the other hand, has been groomed for bigger things, as I show in my article of about the same time, “Double Agent Ruddy Reaches for Media Pinnacle.” In so doing he has had to change his act in a manner that is on a par with a professional wrestler converting from villain to good guy—or vice versa, depending upon one’s ideological leanings. He has now disavowed his “crazy Clinton conspiracies of the 1990s.” How far he has gone is well captured by this quote from Business Week, cited in my article:

Ruddy’s own conservatism, despite a fervent anti-Obama streak, is far from Tea Party obstructionism. “People mellow or change or get perspective as they age,” says liberal journalist Joe Conason, often Ruddy’s foil during the Clinton battles, who now counts him as a friend. “Or most people do. He’s not this right-wing kid that he was.”

Notice that it is Conason, along with co-author Gene Lyons, and their book, The Hunting of the President: The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton, whom Corn invokes in his Mother Jones article for a blanket denunciation of any suggestion that the Clintons might have been involved in the sort of illegal activities that Ruddy made his bones exposing.

Actually, at that 1995 press conference, Ruddy, born in 1965, was more at the stage of his career for the spook-vetting process than was Corn. Corn was already 36 years old and had written the book Blond Ghost: Ted Shackley and the CIA’s Crusades. Kevin Barrett’s assessment of Corn and that book is summed up in this passage:

Corn is obviously CIA all the way—otherwise why would he cover up Shackley’s connection to the JFK assassination? Why would he write an exhaustive “biography” of Shackley that omitted Shackley’s extensive links to CIA drug running? And most important of all, why would Corn be working overtime against 9/11 truth?

I had long since arrived at a similar evaluation of Corn, as we can see in my 1998 article, “Rotten Goulden/Corn,” in which I pair him with the obvious CIA journalist, Joseph Goulden. In sum, if there any such thing as a journalist who works for the CIA—and if there has ever been any such thing as Operation Mockingbird—then surely Corn is one of them.

Peter Baker

That brings us to current New York Times White House correspondent Peter Baker. This sentence from his Wikipedia page tells you that he is at the very heart of the U.S. media establishment: “Baker is a regular panelist on PBS’s Washington Week and a frequent guest on other television and radio programs.” (If they will just write what’s expected, they can be handsomely paid.)

I don’t recall ever having seen his name until it appeared on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the death of Vince Foster. To my knowledge, it was the first time he had ever written on the subject. His ignorance and his mal-intent showed. He would have been 30 or 31 years old at the time, and it looked to me like this was his baptism in the cauldron of corruption that our press has become:

“Do your part to further the cover-up of this murder, young man, and you will go places.”

He did, and he did. It worked for two members of Kenneth Starr’s cover-up team, John Bates and Brett Kavanaugh, who were made federal judges by President George W. Bush, and it worked for Baker.

Here, in its entirety, is Baker’s Foster-debut article and how I reacted to it the time. Those familiar with my subsequent work will notice that I let one of Baker’s biggest and most important whoppers go right by me. I still had—and still do have—quite a bit to learn:

Post Propaganda on Foster

Would they have to write such simple-minded propaganda pieces as this if there were not a major cover-up going on? Look for my parenthetic comments.

One Death Altered Path of Presidency

Five Years Later, Clinton White House Still Facing Aftermath of Foster Suicide

 

By Peter Baker

Washington Post Staff Writer

Monday, July 20, 1998; Page A01

After a cheeseburger lunch at his desk, Vincent W. Foster Jr. left his office around 1 p.m., saying he would be back. Five hours later, his lifeless body was found next to a Civil War cannon in a Virginia park. (Neither The Post nor anyone else in the press has ever had the first question about the preposterous story about the finding of the body.) As his compatriots at the White House struggled to absorb the shock, one senior official told a colleague, “I don’t know that it’ll ever be the same after this.”

Few statements have been so prescient. Five years ago today, the man who grew up with President Clinton (No he didn’t. Clinton moved away from Hope after kindergarten.) and practiced law with Hillary Rodham Clinton drove across the Potomac River, shot himself at Fort Marcy Park and ultimately altered the course of a presidency.

What was certainly a personal tragedy for his friends and family became a defining event for a young administration, one that robbed any remaining innocence (Now there’s a good one. What about the Waco massacre and the sordid Arkansas past?) from the fresh-faced crew that had arrived in Washington brimming with optimism just six months earlier, one that permanently colored how the nation’s leader looks at its capital and its culture, and one that spawned an enduring climate of suspicion and a cottage industry of conspiracy theories. (It’s always a theory when it’s the government. When you’re the girl friend of a drug dealer, it’s twenty years to life.)

Even now, five years removed, the aftermath of Vince Foster’s suicide continues to ripple through the Clinton White House, whether it be a new book examining the events surrounding his death (I would heartily recommend “The Secret Life of Bill Clinton,” by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard.) or a ruling by the Supreme Court just a few weeks ago setting a national precedent on the bounds of attorney-client privilege.

“It was a deep cut,” said Thomas F. “Mack” McLarty, the former White House chief of staff who grew up in Hope, Ark., with Clinton (Tell a lie often enough and maybe people will believe it.) and Foster. “It clearly had a tremendous impact.”

Just how tremendous would be hard to overestimate. Foster became a symbol of the travails of the Arkansas circle around the Clintons. He became a cult figure among some of the same people obsessed by the John F. Kennedy assassination and Roswell UFOs. (Truth Suppression #5) But there are those looking back now who believe that had Foster lived, the story of the Clinton presidency would have been different in tangible ways—albeit for vastly divergent reasons.

“I thought his death changed history in some respects,” Bernard Nussbaum, who was White House counsel and Foster’s immediate boss at the time, said in an interview last week. (Now there’s a good, discredited person to interview. Why not interview the witness, Patrick Knowlton, who is sure Foster’s car was not at the park, when his body was?)

In the months after Foster died, as the controversy over Whitewater bloomed into a full-fledged Washington scandal, Nussbaum was the lone voice in the upper ranks of the White House resisting the call for the appointment of a special prosecutor, arguing that it would lead to a never-ending search for crimes where they did not exist.

Nussbaum lost the fight. Clinton reluctantly agreed to an investigation into his real estate dealings back in Arkansas, leading to the appointment of special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. and his successor, Kenneth W. Starr, and the resulting years of subpoenas, indictments and court battles that touched on everything from FBI files to Foster’s death to Clinton’s alleged sexual adventures. (“Please don’t throw me in the briar patch,” said Br’er Rabbit. The revelation by Dan Moldea that [Washington Times reporter] Jerry Seper lied about his Park Police sources for the news that Whitewater documents were removed from Foster’s offices gives away the game. This was a White House leak to cause a Special Prosecutor to be appointed to perform the cover-up duties in the Foster case. The Park Police report with all of its curious, indefensible redactions would have never done the job.)

“If Vince had been around to support that position, if I hadn’t been the only one among his senior aides to take that position, he would have had a big impact,” Nussbaum said. “I really believe if Vince had lived, the president would not have sought the appointment of an independent counsel, and history would have been different.”

A former investigator who looked into many of those issues has reached the same conclusion from another vantage point.

The way the White House seemed to stand in the way of the Justice Department and others investigating Foster’s death and the belated discovery that Whitewater files had been removed from his office—described by a subsequent Senate report as a “pattern of stonewalling” –generated a brush fire of speculation that there must be something the Clintons were hiding. (Who could imagine such a thing of the Clintons or The Post?)

“I don’t think the suicide per se was the significant thing,” said the investigator, who declined to be identified for fear it might affect his current business. (Another way of saying, “We’re making up a source here to shovel out the propaganda line you are supposed to swallow.”) “I think the handling of the Department of Justice by the White House counsel’s office in the days after the suicide ignited Whitewater. Had that not happened, the whole thing might never have triggered all the interest in Congress and ultimately the independent counsel.”

Foster came to Washington after the 1992 election with no experience in the hothouse world of national politics. A tall, slender lawyer known for his handsome face and gracious though reserved manner, (A Davidson gentleman, as we liked to say back then.) Foster was a lifelong friend of the president (We previously pointed out that, for what it is worth, this statement is not true.), but really was closer to Hillary Clinton (No kidding), who playfully called him “Vincenzo” and palled around with him and their fellow partner at Little Rock’s Rose Law Firm, Webster L. Hubbell (to the point of being joint beneficiaries to an annuity), who would join them in Washington as associate attorney general.

Foster’s six months as deputy White House counsel were marked by unaccustomed controversy—failed nominations for attorney general, challenges to the secrecy of the first lady’s health care task force and, finally, the travel office affair in which longtime employees were fired while business was steered to the president’s allies. (Oh yes, there was the matter of the immolation of all those offbeat Christians at Waco. It’s easy for a Christian-bashing paper like The Post to forget such things, I guess.)

He took the criticism far more seriously than many and in words that effectively became his epitaph, he wrote in a note found ripped up after his death that while neither he nor anyone in the White House violated any law, “the public will never believe the innocence of the Clintons and their loyal staff. . . . I was not meant for the job or the spotlight of public life in Washington. Here ruining people is considered sport.” (But the note was obviously forged and planted.)

His reaction to that had no parallel in modern U.S. history. Foster was the first person at the top echelon of government to kill himself since James V. Forrestal committed suicide in 1949 shortly after being replaced as defense secretary. And the bitter sentiment of Foster’s note struck a nerve in a highly political, fiercely partisan city.

“His death, I think, really made people think,” said William Kennedy, another Rose partner who served as associate White House counsel (who hastened over to the morgue along with Craig Livingstone to identify Vince’s already well-identified body. After the visit, the keys that had not been found in a previous search of Foster’s pants pockets were “found” by Park Police.) but returned to Little Rock after an unhappy time in the capital. “And I think it was one of those events that for once made people in Washington stop and seriously examine what they were doing –how they approach things, what their values were, what they should be doing. And from that perspective, it was a sea change. It did force that reexamination.”

Kennedy (another fine, objective authority to interview) paused as he thought about this. “But,” he added, “and I say this with a great deal of sadness, nothing seems to have changed.”

The president appears to share that judgment. It was after Foster’s suicide that he began talking about the culture of poison in Washington, (gag me with a spoon) a recurring theme for the last five years and the main thing he said at his second inauguration in 1997 that he wanted to cure.

As recently as Saturday night, while not mentioning Foster, Clinton on a weekend trip home to Little Rock referred to Washington as “a completely different culture.”

“There are times when I wake up in our nation’s capital, and I deal with people day in and day out, and they say one thing one day, and then the next day they’re trying to basically say that I’m the worst thing since Joe Stalin,” Clinton said.

But even in the midst of his latest controversy, the investigation into his ties with Monica S. Lewinsky, Clinton assured his fellow Arkansans that he will survive. “I mean, I don’t know what you all expected,” he said Saturday night at a fund-raiser. “Did you think they’d wheel me in here in a gurney tonight? Listen, you prepared me well. This is no big deal.”

Some aides said the Foster suicide did have some salutary effects within the White House. It served, they said, as a wake-up call highlighting the importance of balancing a workaholic schedule with personal life.

“Even considering how pressurized and intense the work is here,” said presidential counselor Douglas B. Sosnik, “this is a very family friendly workplace in which we’re constantly reminded of what’s most important in your life, which is your family.” (It’s dry-heave time)

Perhaps the chief irony of Foster’s death is that a man who so hated the spotlight will forever be remembered by some as the center of a bizarre conspiracy in the mode of the JFK killing. (Could anything be more bizarre than the suicide story they are peddling? Well, perhaps the magic bullet is.) No matter that every investigation that has looked at the case—including the Park Police, two congressional inquiries, Fiske and, finally last year, Starr –came to the same, unequivocal conclusion that Foster died at his own hand in Fort Marcy Park. (This is why they had to get a special prosecutor appointed, to personalize the cover-up. Truth Suppression #7) There will always be people convinced that Foster was murdered in a safe house in Northern Virginia. (Now you know for sure that’s not how it happened. This is obvious misdirection.) That his body was rolled up in a carpet and moved to the park. That he had been involved in a CIA-sponsored drug-smuggling operation. (Now they’re even making me wonder if that’s why he was killed.)

In retrospect, according to some people close to him and the White House, the fuel for that fire resulted from the confluence of three factors—speculation about Foster’s relationship with Hillary Clinton, the Whitewater connection and the seemingly hurried initial investigation hindered by White House-erected obstacles.

The White House search of Foster’s office the night of his death continues to cause mystery. During the formal search two days later, Nussbaum insisted on looking through all the papers himself, contrary to an earlier agreement, while angry Justice Department and police investigators looked on and were shown only what the White House counsel deemed relevant.

The White House did not disclose the discovery of the torn-up note until days later, after notifying Foster’s family. (How do we know this? Could it be they hadn’t yet forged it when they said they had discovered it?) Five months later, the White House acknowledged that Foster had a file on Whitewater. Two years after his death, the White House produced handwritten notes in which Foster wrote that Whitewater was “a can of worms you shouldn’t open.” (Probably forged as well.) In January 1996, the White House discovered and turned over long-missing Rose firm billing records last thought to be in Foster’s possession.

Nussbaum remains convinced he made the right decision to protect sensitive White House documents and personal papers unrelated to Foster’s death. “If I make a mistake, I have a history of admitting a mistake,” he said. “But what happened there was the right way . . . for a lawyer to act in that circumstance. The only regret I have is not talking more publicly, defending myself more publicly.”

But critics said the incident provided the first major evidence of what would become a pattern of the Clinton White House: exacerbating political and legal trouble by not being as forthcoming as it should. (Truth Suppression #9)

“Every single incident since Vince Foster, the same issues keep coming up,” said Robert J. Giuffra Jr., who was chief counsel to the Senate Special Whitewater Committee. “History keeps repeating itself. . . . Many of the same things they’re being criticized for in the Lewinsky matter are things they were criticized for in the handling of Foster’s office.”

Only last month what may be the last of the legal issues arising from Foster’s death was resolved. Starr tried to subpoena three pages of notes taken by a lawyer Foster consulted nine days before killing himself. But the attorney, James Hamilton, persuaded the Supreme Court that attorney-client privilege persists after a client’s death, setting a binding precedent that will have major impact on the legal profession across the country. That was an unforeseen legacy that Foster, the lawyer’s lawyer, would have liked.

Others around Foster have moved on. His wife, Lisa, moved back to Arkansas and married a federal judge, James Moody. His oldest son has become an investment banker, his youngest just graduated from college. (And The Post, along with the entire news media, swallowed the story that the Park Police never interviewed the sons, not even about the ownership of the gun, because the Foster family lawyer wouldn’t let them do it.)

Last month, his alma mater, the University of Arkansas law school, created a professorship in his name.

The Clintons, too, have gone on. They do not talk about Foster often, according to their friends, but they probably think about him. (Now if those pesky Burketts, whose “suicided” son had the same autopsy doctor as Foster, would just “go on.”)

“This is just an ache in their heart that will just never go away,” said Diane Blair, a close confidant of Hillary Clinton from Arkansas.

David Martin

July 21, 1998

 

Did you catch that big overlooked lie? “Foster was the first person at the top echelon of government to kill himself since James V. Forrestal committed suicide in 1949 shortly after being replaced as defense secretary.” I did not write my debut article on that subject until more than four years later.

Unfortunately, the penultimate paragraph is also out of date. Like the corrupt coroner, Dr. James C. Beyer, who jimmied up both the autopsy of their murdered son, college student Tommy Burkett, and the murdered Foster, both Burkett parents have “gone on” to the afterlife. They died of cancer within a couple of years of one another, and their web site thepacc.org, has literally gone to the dogs. It stood for Parents against Corruption and Cover-up. It has since been taken over by People against Canine Cruelty (to cats?). In this update I have replaced the old link to “Burketts” above with an original from the Internet archives of the WayBack Machine.

Returning to Baker, one of the benefits of selling out to Mister Big is that you get promoted and you get to publish books and have them promoted by your employers. We have seen it in spades with David Von Drehle, who was given a “book leave” by his Washington Post employer after the yeoman work that he did on the Foster murder cover-up and was made the editor of their Style section upon his return.   For his part, Baker and his wife Susan Glasser were sent off to Moscow to cover Russia and Vladimir Putiin. How they covered it and the “expert” opinion that he can be expected to furnish on the TV news programs these days can be found in the predictable book that resulted from their time there. I have not read their Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the End of Revolution, but from all that I have seen of Baker and the Post, and his current Times employer as well, this critical customer’s review of the Kindle edition sums it up pretty well:

If you are looking for Russophobic propaganda, this book will do nicely. The anti-Putin, and frequently anti-Russian bias is pervasive throughout its pages. Of actual scholarship and research there is almost none. It is clear that the authors started writing this book having already reached two conclusions: (1) Everything in Russia is horrible, and (2) It’s all Putin’s fault. The book has many flaws, but it turns simply disgusting when the authors delve into the subject of terrorism. The quasi-apologist attitude and the lack of serious condemnation were strongly offensive. Apparently, when a group of individuals is murdering defenseless women and children “over there”, they are not terrorists, but cute and cuddly resistance fighters. Disgusting.

In conclusion, I would like to recommend an alternative for anyone interested in a much more unbiased and scholarly perspective. The book is “Putin: Russia’s Choice”, by Richard Sakwa. Dr. Sakwa is the Head of the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Kent. His book is available on Amazon.com: Putin: Russia’s Choice

My local Fairfax County (VA) system has five copies of the Baker-Glasser book in its various libraries. They have no copies of the Sakwa book, apparently offering no alternative to the mainstream news propaganda of Baker and his cohorts. I have no plans to read any books by either Baker or Corn, and when their faces appear on the TV screen, my first impulse will be to go for the clicker.

 

David Martin

February 18, 2015

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Happy Valentine’s Day: Here’s To Burning Love


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How Brian Williams Almost “Chinookered” Us

How Brian Williams Almost “Chinookered” Us

by DC Dave

Integrity is everything. If you can fake integrity, you’ve really got it made.

Groucho Marx

 

For a while there it looked like the man with the oh-so-comforting-and-comfortable face, Brian Williams, was about to inherit the Walter Cronkite mantle as the “most trusted man in the United States.” He is the major network news anchor with the longest tenure now, and his NBC Nightly News program is the most watched of the big three. He sits right at the cornerstone of the U.S. government-corporation-media establishment. His is the first name and the first face that appears on the Council of Foreign Relations “About CFR” (“Trust us.”) web site. You can see him lending his credibility to the CFR at the 2:07 and 2:41 marks of their video. (I have saved the web page. Any bets that the name and face won’t be there this time next year?)

About CFR

Without doubt his stature and acclaim reached a high water mark in the country on the night of Thursday January 29 when he was hailed at the New York Rangers game against the Montreal Canadiens along with the man who helped him “return to his wife and family” after the Chinook helicopter in which Williams was riding had to make a forced landing after taking crippling enemy fire. He and his Army rescuer basked in the approval from the standing ovation they received from the fans. Williams still looked enormously pleased with himself as he reported what had happened on his NBC Evening News program the next night.

Tom Brokaw was in the anchor chair when the episode happened in March of 2003 and at that time Williams reported the episode somewhat differently. Then it was the Chinook ahead of them that had taken fire. The helicopter in which Williams was riding had come along some time later and had been trapped for a while on the ground in a sand storm. A decade later at the latest, in March of 2013, the story had mutated into the one that the Rangers public address announcer told to the adoring crowd. Then Williams told it with a straight face—in his own words—to the equally approving David Letterman on the latter’s show before a national audience.

But Williams had gone too far with his January 30 NBC News story on himself at the Rangers game. Crew members who were on the Chinook with him knew that they had not taken fire and they prompted the military newspaper Stars and Stripes to look into it. That newspaper quickly determined that Williams’ story of having been forced to land on account of enemy-caused damage to the helicopter was not true. On February 4, on his Nightly News program the grossly overpaid anchor was forced to make an apology. He did not apologize for having lied, though. In a statement that would have done Bill Clinton proud, he said that he “made a mistake in recalling the events of 12 years ago.” On the Nightly News Facebook page he said, “I think the constant viewing of the video showing us inspecting the impact area—and the fog of memory over 12 years—made me conflate the two, and I apologize.”

His problem—and NBC’s problem and the CFR’s problem and a lot of other people’s problem—is that nobody believes this faulty memory excuse, and why should they? Would you ever confuse the automobile accident that you came upon some time after its occurrence with the one you experienced yourself, even if it was a dozen years—or a half a century—later? He has now compounded his lie by lying about how he came to tell it. Worse than that, NBC as a news organization has now joined in the lying. When Williams was on the Letterman show or talking to the Knicks’ PA system man, he was ostensibly on his own, a mere newsreader straying off the reservation. But here’s how it worked when the late Sandy Socolow was Walter Cronkite’s handler at CBS as The Washington Post tells us, and it’s certainly little different at NBC today, “Mr. Socolow’s title in the 1960s and early 1970s was producer, an industry term that did not fully convey his influence as the man who vetted nearly everything written and uttered by the host.”

The attitude that NBC has exhibited is well characterized by something H.L. Mencken wrote in his essay, “On Being an American”:

[Great as it is, the average American’s] docility and pusillanimity may be overestimated and sometimes I think they are overestimated by his present masters. They assume that there is absolutely no limit to his capacity for being put on and knocked about—that he will submit to any invasion of his freedom and dignity, however outrageous, so long as it is depicted in melodious terms. He permitted the late war to be “sold” to him by the methods of the methods of the grind-shop auctioneer…

The “late war” that Mencken was talking about was World War I, and that brings us to what Williams should really apologize to us for if he had one genuine and decent bone in his body. His was one of the most melodious of the network voices that gave us the hard sell for invading Iraq for completely trumped-up reasons. The fact that NBC was owned by one of the biggest military contractors, General Electric, might have something to do with his employer’s enthusiasm for going into the war, but all the other major news organs across the political spectrum share NBC’s guilt. One must wonder if the Roman Catholic Williams has at least gone to confession over his latest lies and the much bigger and more consequential lies in which he participated earlier.

As a reminder of how Brian Williams’ and his media colleagues’ hands are bathed in blood, we might go back to a satire we wrote about one of the more tragic episodes of the war for American servicemen back in November of 2003. In contrast to Williams’ Chinook and the one far in front of him, this one when it went down cost a lot of lives.

I might remind readers that my web site began as a column for the “underground” newspaper of Atlanta, The Great Speckled Bird, which was most active as a protest organ during the Vietnam War. I would email my articles and poems to him and the editor, Tom Sparks, would format them and put them up. I took my part of it over only when Tom became too ill to continue with The Great Speckled Bird. I tried to write my satire (now with links that were never part of the Martin-Sparks collaboration) in the form of a typical mainstream news article.

Cause of Chinook Crash Still Undetermined

         The Great Speckled Bird has learned that U.S. government authorities are beginning to doubt that the Chinook helicopter that crashed on November 2 near Fallujah in Iraq, killing 16 and injuring 26, was brought down by an enemy missile. The FBI, which has taken over the investigation of the crash, has sent a team of investigators to the area, They have commandeered a Fallujah warehouse that was formerly a repair facility for the fleet of limousines that transported Saddam Hussein, his two late sons, and their numerous wives and mistresses. They are using it as a venue for the reassembly of the Chinook, piece by piece. When the work is complete, expected to be within a few months, a definitive report on the cause of the crash will be released.

Although the Chinook crashed on land and not over water like TWA 800—the Boeing 747 whose fuel tank spontaneously blew up off the coast of Long Island on the evening of July 17, 1996—and there was little scattering of the wreckage, recovery of all the parts, according to sources, will probably be a slow process. Iraqi civilians reached the site before a U.S. Army rescue team did and carried off as war trophies anything that could be lifted by hand and carried on the back of a pickup truck. The FBI is offering a reward of $250 per pound, no questions asked, for any parts of the Chinook–the workhorse of the U.S. Army–that may be brought to them.

“Of the $87 billion we have been given to play with in the coming year, this expenditure, though open ended, is likely to amount to little more than budget dust and should be well worth it,” said one official, using a Pentagon expression usually applied to items of less than $100,000.

Unreliable Initial Reports

         Asked why initial reports indicated that the Chinook was probably downed by a shoulder-fired missile, an FBI source noted a number of high-profile cases in which it has been involved where the initial reports proved to be in error. In the case of the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, by Timothy McVeigh, there were initial reports of several unexploded bombs being found in the building, in addition to the massive fuel-oil-fertilizer bomb that was in the Ryder Truck that McVeigh parked in the street in front of the building. There were also reports that McVeigh was with an accomplice when he rented the truck and with other accomplices when he was seen in the truck on the day of the bombing. All these reports were determined by the FBI to be in error.

In the case of the suicide of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster on July 20, 1993, it was initially reported that the Foster family was certain that he had received no medical treatment for his depression, and this proved not to be the case. There were also mistaken initial reports that the nondescript revolver found in Foster’s hand was part of a matched set and a handwritten list of local psychiatrists was found in his office and had only two names on it. Actually, the list had three names on it and the paper with the names was found by U.S. Park Police when they searched his car in Fort Marcy Park.

In a lesser-known case in which the FBI became involved, that of the murder of three Starbucks employees in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC, on the evening of July 6, 1997, one of whom was a former Clinton White House intern and lesbian political activist, there were initial reports of a witness attempting to gain entrance after closing time and being turned away from the locked door by the employees. Police and the FBI finally concluded that the lone killer, using two guns in a botched robbery, had gained admittance to the store before the front door was locked for the night.

Even the rifle that Lee Harvey Oswald used to kill President John F. Kennedy was initially reported by a gun expert who examined it to be a German Mauser instead of Oswald’s mail-order Italian-made Mannlicher-Carcano, and Kennedy was said to have been turned around looking in the direction of the Texas Schoolbook Depository when the first bullet struck him in the throat. We would later learn that the small hole in Kennedy’s throat was really an exit wound, caused by the same bullet that made a hole some six inches down from the collar of his suit jacket and then went through John Connally’s rib, lung, and wrist and lodged briefly in his thigh.

Mistaken Witnesses

         One FBI source was particularly contemptuous of reports of “eyewitnesses” purporting to have seen one or two missiles streaking up from a date palm grove toward the helicopter.

“Do you know how many people thought they saw a missile going up toward TWA 800?” he asked rhetorically. “There must have been several hundred,” he said, “and these were all Americans, not just Iraqis with an axe to grind.”

He went on to explain that the Iraqis in the Fallujah area were jubilant over the crash of the helicopter and were all too eager to believe that “resistance fighters” had the ability to bring it down.

“We have been on the case for a week now,” said the official, “and we are yet to find an Iraqi who says he saw a missile and will also tell us his full name, address, and place of work.”

The official, alluding as well to the aforementioned Oklahoma City bombing case, said that in seemingly clear-cut examples, eyewitnesses, especially when they are mere citizens without the expertise of the FBI, are often wrong.

Citing another example, he said that every single person who saw Vince Foster’s light gray Honda at Fort Marcy Park where his body was found described it as “brown” or “reddish-brown,” and not a one of the two dozen people at the park who saw the body noted the half-dollar sized exit wound in the crown of Foster’s head later discovered in the autopsy.

One emergency worker even thought he saw a bullet hole in Foster’s neck and an automatic pistol in Foster’s hand instead of a revolver. He later admitted that he might have been wrong after extensive re-interviews by FBI agents.

The most famous case of mistaken witnesses that the FBI has exposed with its crack investigations, of course, was in the assassination of President Kennedy. So sure were most of the people in Dealey Plaza that the shots had come from the grassy knoll to the right and front of the motorcade that many of them ran up the hill in an attempt to catch the killer.

FBI Jurisdiction

         Asked why the FBI was conducting the investigation instead of the Army, which lost the helicopter and the personnel in the crash, the FBI source responded that the government “wanted to be certain that the investigation produced the right outcome,” and there is no better investigative body for that purpose than the FBI.

“It’s really no different than the investigation of the September 11, 2001, crash into the Pentagon,” he said. There the victims were also military, but the FBI kept military investigators out of the picture.

He also mentioned the investigation of the bombing of the Murrah Building, from which uncooperative Oklahoma City police officers like Terrance Yeakey (who later committed suicide in despondency) where totally excluded, and TWA 800, which normally would have been the responsibility of the National Transportation Safety Board. In that case, the FBI re-assembled the entire airplane in a hangar in order to come up with its spontaneous-explosion conclusion.

The FBI also found it necessary to get into the case of the botched-robbery murders at the Washington, DC, Starbucks, even though there were apparently no federal laws violated because, “with the District police in charge, this high-profile case was apparently not going to be brought to closure.” Similarly, ostensibly no federal laws were violated in the murder of rock legend John Lennon, but the FBI handled that investigation, as well.

“The public is not generally aware of the extent of the FBI’s international responsibilities,” added a senior Defense Department official. “The FBI is deeply involved in intelligence gathering on a continuous basis in Iraq,” he said, “and they are to be credited with our great successes up to this point in the guerilla war,” he said.

FBI international operations were supposedly initiated on a large scale for the first time in the Clinton administration and have expanded in the George W. Bush administration. The Great Speckled Bird has learned, however, that the FBI has been engaged in international intelligence gathering in competition with the Central Intelligence Agency for quite a long time, even in the absence of a legislative mandate. After the failure of other organizations, the FBI has also been recently given the task of finding Saddam Hussein’s missing weapons of mass destruction.

As for the likely cause of the Chinook crash, the FBI source said that they were examining all possibilities. Three, in particular, were mentioned, static electricity in the fuel tank as with TWA 800, a pin falling out of a grenade carried by one of the soldiers, or a suicidal soldier who may have intentionally blown the helicopter up.

David Martin

November 11, 2003

 

bwilliamshelicrash

In reviewing this litany of outrages, one can see that there is more truth than ever to Mencken’s observation about our rulers that, “They assume that there is absolutely no limit to [our] capacity for being put on and knocked about.” We might also note that Williams was NBC’s chief White House correspondent during a good part of the Clinton years and, as such, no doubt did quite a bit more reporting and covering-up for which he should issue an apology to the American people and make a confession to his priest.

 

David Martin

February 5, 2015

See also “Clinton and Cronkite: Odd Couple?”

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The Cuban Cigar Scam

The Cuban Cigar Scam

by DC Dave

cuban_cigars_58979-1920x1200

There was a tone of friendly confidentiality in his voice and a rather mischievous twinkle in his eye as he said to me, “See that box over there. Those cigars sell for $250, but I could write up a receipt for you that would say you paid $60 for them. You’d still have another $40 to play with. Those customs people don’t have the time to check on what everything really costs.”

We were in Marigot, the capital and main city of Saint Martin, the French part of the Caribbean island of St. Maarten/St. Martin, shared by the Dutch and the French. In front of me was the largest collection of cigars that I have seen outside a JR’s store, and they were apparently all made in Cuba.

What with the announcement by President Obama that we were normalizing relations with that nearest island country to the United States in the Greater Antilles, I was curious as to whether it was legal now to bring Cuban cigars into the United States. I knew that I had not yet seen any announcement to that effect, so I had asked the store’s cigar salesman about it.

“Oh yes. They’re legal for Americans now,” he responded confidently, “but you can bring in only $100 worth for personal use.” At that point he produced an official looking sheet of paper purporting to show the new rules governing business with Cuba by Americans, with the part about the cigars and a $100 maximum highlighted in yellow. That explains the need for the proposed receipt legerdemain.

So there it was in black and white (and yellow). Who could doubt it? How many people, one must wonder, have seen this great opportunity to load up on the precious, newly available commodity, perhaps even with a thought of bending the rules a bit more by reselling them individually once back in the States? At the very least it looked like an opportunity to make a big impression on friends and associates.

Still, I had some nagging doubt. I like to think that I’m a good deal better informed about such things than the average person, and this “new policy,” as I have indicated, was news to me. Furthermore, this amiable salesperson had just confided to me that he would freely lie for me when it was to our mutual advantage. Why wouldn’t he lie just as readily to me when it was to his advantage alone? He could see that I was wearing on my chest a stick-on number that marked me as a member of a tour group from one of the five cruise ships that was in port that day. All the ships were moored at the Dutch side of the island in Phillipsburg. The likelihood that I, or any such customer like me, would return to the store and confront him after doing some Internet research was quite remote.

Later, back on the ship in the ever smaller area to which cigar smokers are confined, I told a fellow passenger about the “new policy” as presented to me by the store man in Marigot. My interlocutor, whom I had tried not to bias with my presentation and who struck me as a rather sagacious fellow, said simply that he doubted it. I don’t think he would have fallen for the pitch, but I also think he is a rare one. The salesman was very persuasive.

The facts of the Cuban cigar policy began to come into clearer focus upon our port of disembarkation, the U.S. island of Puerto Rico. (Celebrity, the cruise line I was using, charges an arm and a leg for WiFi and for their computer use, so I had remained in Internet darkness.)   The ship’s daily flier told us, for the first time, that it was illegal to bring Cuban-made products, including cigars, back into the United States. Just to make sure, I asked the U.S. customs agent there about the policy. He told me that he expected the policy to change in the near future, but for now, at least when it comes to Cuban products bought outside Cuba, it remains what it has been for most of my lifetime.

And what, exactly, is that policy? For that we go to the Frequently Asked Questions of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, one of which is, “Can I import Cuban cigars into the U.S.?”

Persons authorized to travel to Cuba may purchase alcohol and tobacco products while in Cuba for personal consumption while there. Authorized travelers may return to the United States with up to $100 worth of alcohol and/or tobacco products acquired in Cuba in accompanied baggage, for personal use only.

Foreign residents and visitors to the U.S. (i.e., French, Mexican etc) may not bring in goods of Cuban origin under any circumstances.  Purchasing Cuban-orgin [sic] cigars and/or Cuban-origin rum or other Cuban-origin alcohol over the internet [sic] or while in a third country (i.e. not Cuba) remains prohibited.

For more information about travel to Cuba, please see the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). *

Criminal penalties for violation of the Regulations range up to $1,000,000 in fines for corporations, $250,000 for individuals and up to 10 years in prison. Civil penalties of up to $65,000 per violation may be imposed by OFAC.

Does that clear things up? Maybe not, if you are the sort of person who needs an explanation, with examples, of what “foreign” or “third country” means in this context. Perhaps a quite easy-to-imagine scenario will bring it all home, so to speak. Let us say we have a tourist (T) passing through customs in San Juan or Miami after visiting St. Martin on his cruise of the Caribbean. He encounters the customs agent (CA):

CA: You say on your declaration here that you have $100 worth of cigars. Where were those cigars made?

T: In Cuba.

CA: Did someone give you those cigars?

T: Oh no. I bought them in St. Martin. I have a receipt here. See.

CA: So, you bought a box of 20 Cohiba cigars for $60 and a box of 20 Montecristo cigars for $40?

At this point our credulous cigar lover is probably beginning to sweat. He has begun to realize that $3 each for the top name Cuban cigar and $2 each for a serious rival is too good a bargain for anyone to believe, but he does have it in writing.

CA: Do you realize that you could be looking at a fine of up to a quarter of a million dollars and a prison sentence of up to ten years?

T: (Gulp) But I thought I could bring in $100 worth with no trouble.

CA: Who told you that?

T: The man at the cigar store.

CA: (Stares at the man silently for a few seconds, slowly shaking his head.)

T: But he showed me on a piece of paper…

CA: (The head shaking and silent stare continues. Reading the tourist’s name on his customs declaration, he calls to his associate to check him out on the computer for his criminal record.)

Now thinking the $450 he actually spent for the cigars is a small price to pay to escape his current predicament, our panicked tourist decides to try to cut his losses.

T: Well let’s just mark those off the customs form. It was pretty stupid of me to believe that guy. Forget about those cigars. Here, I’ll get them out of the suitcase. I don’t care what you do with them.

CA: It’s too late for that.

T: What do you mean?

CA: You broke the law when you bought those Cuban cigars. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. Even if you had smoked them all before coming back into the country you’d still be a lawbreaker. Of course, you probably wouldn’t have been caught, but we have it in writing from you, with your signature, that you bought them.

T: (Now it’s his turn for silent head shaking, but instead of staring at the agent, he’s looking down at the ground.)

CA: (To the rescue) Tell you what we’ll do. The computer says you have a clean record. Just put the cigars in the bin over there, and let this be a lesson to you.

Don’t ask me what happens to the growing number of Cuban cigars that Customs must be confiscating since the new Cuba policy was announced, but if there is a burgeoning black market in premium Cuban brands in San Juan and Miami, I would not be at all surprised.

Isn’t it great to live in the land of the free, the only country on earth whose citizens are still forbidden under serious penalty of law to purchase and enjoy Cuban cigars?

As a postscript, to any readers who might suspect that I was actually victimized by the smooth-talking cigar salesman, I can only say that, for some measure of revenge I would at least name the store in question and give the man’s ethnicity, which was clearly different from that of the majority of the population of the island. Having not been stung, I’ll just let the old caveat emptor dictum hold sway. At least those who read this article are warned, and if they encounter that guy in Marigot, St. Martin, until the policy actually does change, they should tell him he’s a liar to his face.

* It’s still not easy for Americans to travel to Cuba. At the time of this writing it continues to be banned for purely recreational purposes.

Image

David Martin

February 3, 2015

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