B’Man’s Guest Post: Noor Al Haqiqa’s “DRAG QUEEN’ BARBIE!”

Here you have the latest perversion
~ another moral assault ~
being aimed at our children.

Somehow, Pre-WW2 Berlin does not seem to be such a stretch when compared to today’s libertine ways. But to begin moral corruption…. with childhood toys, is indeed pure 2012 baseness and an indication of just how low America has fallen morally.The effect of these dolls on young girls and boys cannot be ignored.

By Noor Al Haqiqa

August 6, 2012

Fashion has been used as a weapon of the NWO for some time now.  It is through dress that much of the acceptance and integration of corruption of our children has taken place. The whole androgynous and gender bending movement, so pushed upon us by the “anything goes” mantra of today has been shaping our children for decades. It began in the 1960’s and has only become more obscene over time.

Now we have a new moral affront to our children that will be available for next Christmas at approximately $150 a pop. Drag queen Barbie.

Barbie, the blond and blue-eyed symbol of mainstream America made her debut in 1959. The original Barbie doll was created by a woman named Ruthe Handler who was inspired by a pornographic German doll called Lillie who had been created by a porn company and focused towards men. So perhaps this latest Barbie doll is not quite so far off track….

Mattel Inc. might have been hard to imagine that someday the gender-bending design team the Blonds would be the inspiration for arguably the most coveted doll in America. Thankfully, we did not even know what gender bending was back in those lovely innocent days.

Art imitates life: NYC design duo Phillipe (left) and David Blond are the team behind Drag Barbie. The one in the dress is just a tad terrifying to contemplate.

This latest perversion in children’s toys, drag queen Barbie doll comes at a time when gender lines in fashion are being blurred more every day. Male models like Andrej Pejic are starring in print layouts and gracing the cover of New York magazine. Androgyny has persisted as one of the most popular fashion trends for the last few years.

“Fashion is a form of self-expression and we believe that everyone should feel glamorous every day,” said Phillipe Blond, a designer of the Blonds.

Dan and Corina LeccaIn 2009, Mattel asked the duo to participate in the doll’s 50th birthday fashion show.

Since their brand started in 2007, the Blonds have always expressed their love for Barbie. Mattel noticed, and in 2009 asked the duo to participate in the doll’s 50th birthday fashion show, foreshadowing their present partnership.

Packed with boldface names and equally amusing fashion folk, the Blonds’ fashion shows are consistently theatrical, but no one seems to outshine the creative depth that Phillipe Blond and his partner and co-designer, David Blond, provide through their bedazzled corsets. The corsets, the crown jewel of every themed show, are also a favorite of celebrities like Katy Perry, Nicki Minaj and Beyonce.

Barbie has served as a female role model for years, donning everything from a nurse’s uniform to an Olympic athlete’s tracksuit and Presidential power suit.

Now, however, the famous plastic doll is aiming to inspire male fans through the first ‘drag queen’ Barbie.

Although the term drag queen is not officially used to describe the new The Blonds Blond Diamond Barbie Doll, the plastic figurine was created in part by New York-based fashion designer Phillipe Blond, who is a cross-dresser himself.

Inspiration: A ‘drag queen’ Barbie has been released It was created, in part by Phillipe Blond (left), who is one half of the New York-based design duo The Blonds. The doll even sports the same eye make-up as above

Mattel, the company that manufactures Barbie, commissioned the work to Phillipe and David Blond of the label The Blonds, who have expressed their adoration for the doll ever since their label was born in 2007.

Cathy Cline, vice president of marketing for Mattel’s girls’ brands, told The New York Times:

‘One of the great things about Barbie is that she continues to push the envelope. Barbie doesn’t worry about what other people think.’

 ED: Do as thou wilt.

Phillipe himself expressed the same sentiment.

‘Fashion is a form of self-expression and we believe that everyone should feel glamorous every day,’ he said.

ED: Call me what you will but I cannot look at this creature and shudder at applying “he” or “she” to it.

Glamour: The doll wears a mini dress covered in bling as well as metallic silver shoes and an elaborate cuff

Details: The doll wears a chunky silver cuff and ring as well as sparkly pumps on her tiny feet

The doll features a side-swept hair style and an extremely short bejeweled mini corset dress that is laced up at the back.

She pairs the look with flashy accessories also’ a chunky silver cuff, a sparkling cocktail ring and silver metallic pumps that feature a lipstick pink sole.

A full-length faux fox fur coat completes the dramatic look.

Given that he is most often found in nosebleed-high Louboutin’s, blond locks and a get-up that could out-sparkle Liza Minnelli, it’s easy to see where Phillipe’s appreciation may lie.

Phillipe himself sports similar long blonde hair to the doll, though his design partner David stressed that it is not a true representation of him.

Instead, the doll ‘may loosely be based on Phillipe and this character that he plays within our little Blond world,’ David said.

An official description for the doll describes the drag queen figurine as ‘pretty, provocative, and magical’.

It says: ‘Phillipe and David Blond believe that every woman should be glamorous every day.

It then talks about Barbie’s wardrobe picks.

“Gosh, I played with gay drag queen Barbie and now I just don’t know what I really want to be when I grow up! Maybe I can become a drag queen!”.

‘Fun fashion and rock ‘n’ roll glam are the only rules for these gorgeous garments,’ it reads. ‘Our favourite blonde celebrates The Blonds, dressed for an amazing adventure.

‘The Blonds Blond Diamond Barbie brings the most sparkly splendor of fashion.’

Their designs often include sparkly corsets and have been spotted on the likes of Katy Perry, Beyoncé and Nicki Minaj.

What their clothes lack in sensibility, they make up for in glamour. The Blonds aren’t carried in any stores, and for the time being, they cater only to private clients. David said that he hoped this new relationship with Barbie will help their brand become more mainstream.

Their fashion shows are also just as theatrical.

Ah, these folks with the fake gay smiles played with Barbie too. It seems that Barbie is actually a fairly popular icon with the drag set.

“A whole different audience, that’s always good for anyone’s business,” he said. “And that’s the direction we would like to produce ~ things that are more accessible to more people. This is a step in the right direction.”

Ms. Cline said Mattel was talking to the Blonds about what’s next.

I have one very pertinent question.

Is this latest Barbie anatomically correct?

Posted by

Snippits and Snappits is Noor’s blog and an excellent resource for seekers of truth.

You might ask why this concerns me. Its because I have an eight year old who has loved and collected Barbies since she was born (it has been a Christmas present every year since she was born). If and when they introduce the drag queen, we will stop adding to this:

And, please, don’t accuse me of being anti-gay, or whatever. I don’t appreciate the misrepresentation that is obvious here. When I was 20, I lived in New Orleans. Chuckles (my roommate) and I partied hard one night at Fat City, meeting up with a couple of “girls” who danced the night away with us, ate and drank on our dime, then invited us to their apartment on the French Quarter when the sun came up.

I was in the living room with my date and Chuckles went to the bedroom with his.

About 20 minutes later, I heard Chuckles start yelling at his “girl”, threatened to “whip her ass” and came running out to the living room, saying, “This bitch has nuts!”

Fortunately, I had not gotten to whatever ‘base’ he was on.

We left without beating their asses.

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